Mayoral Candidates: Victor E. DiGregorio

Victor DiGregorio has lived in Sanford for 45 years. His educational background includes Harvard University, Boston University, the University of Maine and Nasson College. His varied resume includes working as an aide to Governor Volpe of Massachusetts; bringing the first ice cream trucks to Maine; and owning a cleaning company. He was also a substitute teacher at Sanford High School for many years before retiring.

He served on the City Council from 2017-18, and was a member of the Warrant Committee (which became the Budget Committee) for twenty years.

Mr. DiGregorio chose to run for Mayor rather than City Council because the Mayor has a stronger voice. As the Chairperson of the Council, the Mayor appoints the various subcommittees and has more influence over the discussion. He believes that his diversified background and education are his main qualifications for the office.

His motto is “Sharing, caring and doing,” and adds that he wants to be a catalyst “to stimulate and motivate a solid Sanford and Springvale for seniors and the entire population.”

He agrees with actions the Council has taken to deal with Covid-19, but feels that in this and other matters, the Council is too much under the influence of the City Manager. He believes the two should work together, but maintain more independence. He would also like to see the citizen’s right to vote on the city budget be reinstated.

When asked about other challenges facing our community, he cited an aging population and increasing taxes. He feels there is too much emphasis on beautifying Sanford at the expense of more pressing problems. “We don’t want Sanford to just look good, we want it to be good,” he said. He added that ending the Pay-As-You-Throw program, which he calls an example of double taxation, is on his list of priorities.

With regard to revitalizing Sanford’s retail landscape, Mr. DiGregorio has several ideas, including having a stronger Chamber of Commerce and encouraging businesses that better serve the needs of Sanford’s population. He would like to see more tax incentives to smaller businesses, not just big box stores. But attracting younger people who shop more is also a part of the solution, he said.